Cyber security information center

Introducing the Spring 2016 Post-Intrusion Report

Posted by Wade Williamson on Apr 20, 2016 5:00:00 AM

 
Insights from inside the kill chain

Detection_Overview.pngThis week we are proud to announce the release of the third edition of the Vectra Post-Intrusion Report. And while there are plenty of reports from security vendors out there, this one provides something that is unique.

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Canary in the ransomware mine

Posted by Günter Ollmann on Mar 30, 2016 2:06:10 PM

 

A quick no-frills solution to ransomware inside the enterprise

Ransomware is clearly the scourge of 2016. Every week there is a new and notable enterprise-level outbreak of this insidious class of malware – crippling and extorting an ever widening array of organizations.

For a threat that is overwhelmingly not targeted, it seems to be hitting large and small businesses with great success.

The malware infection can come through the front door of a failed “defense-in-depth” strategy or the side door of a mobile device latched to the corporate network on a Monday morning.

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Topics: cybersecurity, Ransomware


Plan on losing visibility of your network traffic: Steps to take control

Posted by Günter Ollmann on Mar 8, 2016 11:49:57 AM

The ongoing Apple versus the FBI debate has me thinking more about the implications of encryption. Whether or not national governments around the globe choose to go down the path of further regulating encryption key lengths, requiring backdoors to encryption algorithms, mandating key escrow for law enforcement purposes, or generally weakening the implementations of encrypted communications and data storage in consumer technologies, the use of encryption will increase – and in parallel – network visibility of threats will decrease.

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Topics: Malware Attacks, SSL Encryption


Apple vs. the FBI: Some points to consider

Posted by Günter Ollmann on Feb 17, 2016 4:30:00 PM

In light of Apple’s response to the FBI’s request to gain access to San Bernadino shooter Syed Farook’s iPhone, I thought I would share some of my thoughts on this. It appears that there is some confusion in the connection of this request from the FBI with the bigger government debate on providing backdoors and encryption.

Let me attempt to break this down a little in the hopes of clearing some of that confusion:

  • Apple has positioned the request from the FBI to be a request to install a “backdoor” in their product. This is not correct. The FBI request is pretty specific and is not asking for a universal key or backdoor to Apple products.
  • The FBI request should be interpreted as a lawful request to Apple to help construct a forensics recovery tool for a specific product with a unique serial number.
  • The phone in question is an Apple 5C, and the method of access requested by the FBI is actually an exploitation of a security vulnerability in this (older) product. The vulnerability does not exist in the current generation of Apple iPhones. 
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Topics: Cyberattacks, network security, cybersecurity


The Chocolate Sprinkles of InfoSec

Posted by Günter Ollmann on Feb 2, 2016 10:30:33 AM

In the rapidly expanding world of threat intelligence, avalanches of static lists combine with cascades of streaming data to be molded by evermore sophisticated analytics engines the output of which are finally presented in a dazzling array of eye-candy graphs and interactive displays. 

For many of those charged with securing their corporate systems and online presence, the pressure continues to grow for them to figure out some way to incorporate this glitzy wealth of intelligence into tangible and actionable knowledge. 

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Topics: Cyberattacks, IDS, network security, cybersecurity


Who is watching your security technology?

Posted by Günter Ollmann on Jan 28, 2016 12:00:00 PM

It seems that this last holiday season didn’t bring much cheer or goodwill to corporate security teams. With the public disclosure of remotely exploitable vulnerabilities and backdoors in the products of several well-known security vendors, many corporate security teams spent a great deal of time yanking cables, adding new firewall rules, and monitoring their networks with extra vigilance.

It’s not the first time that products from major security vendors have been found wanting. 

It feels as though some vendor’s host-based security defenses fail on a monthly basis, while network defense appliances fail less frequently – maybe twice per year. At least that’s what a general perusal of press coverage may lead you to believe. However, the reality is quite different. Most security vendors fix and patch security weaknesses on a monthly basis. Generally, the issues are ones that they themselves have identified (through internal SDL processes or the use of third-party code reviews and assessment) or they are issues identified by customers. And, every so often, critical security flaws will be “dropped” on the vendor by an independent researcher or security company that need to be fixed quickly. 

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Topics: Cyberattacks, network security, cybersecurity


Blocking Shodan

Posted by Günter Ollmann on Jan 20, 2016 9:30:00 AM

The Internet is chock full of really helpful people and autonomous systems that silently probe, test, and evaluate your corporate defenses every second of every minute of every hour of every day. If those helpful souls and systems aren’t probing your network, then they’re diligently recording and cataloguing everything they’ve found so others can quickly enumerate your online business or list systems like yours that are similarly vulnerable to some kind of attack or other.

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Topics: Cyberattacks, IoT, cybersecurity


Turning a Webcam Into a Backdoor

Posted by Vectra Threat Labs on Jan 12, 2016 5:00:00 AM

Why do this?

Reports of successful hacks against Internet of Things (IoT) devices have been on the rise. Most of these efforts have involved demonstrating how to gain access to such a device or to break through its security barrier. Most of these attacks are considered relatively inconsequential because the devices themselves contain no real data of value (such as credit card numbers or PII). The devices in question generally don't provide much value to a botnet owner as they tend to have access to lots bandwidth, but have very little in terms of CPU and RAM.

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Topics: IoT, Internet of Things, APT, Monitoring


Cybersecurity in 2016: A look ahead

Posted by Hitesh Sheth on Jan 6, 2016 8:58:31 AM

Cybersecurity is a rapidly evolving landscape and this new year will be no different. Attackers will come up with new ways to infiltrate corporate networks and businesses, security vendors will be tasked with staying ahead of them, and governments will talk a lot, yet do very little. Here are some of the ways we see the industry changing shape over the course of 2016: 

Sandboxing will lose its luster and join the ranks of anti-virus signatures.
Anti-malware sandboxing has generated high-flying IPOs and grown to over $1 billion in annual spend. But in 2016, it’ll plummet back to Earth, as organizations realize that malware evades sandboxes as easily as anti-virus signatures. 
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Topics: Cyberattacks, cybersecurity


Automate to optimise your security teams

Posted by Matt Walmsley on Jan 4, 2016 12:56:29 PM

Mind the gap
87% of U.K. senior IT and business professionals believe there is a shortage of skilled cybersecurity staff, the same percentage of UK security leaders also want to hire CISSP credentialed staff into their teams. Nothing of real surprise in that there’s a gap; let’s fill it with demonstrable high calibre professionals, right? Well, not quite. That skills gap also includes a “CISSP” gap. With 10,000+ UK security positions out there but just over 5,000 UK CISSPs, the math simply doesn’t add up. We should also consider that credentials like CISSP demonstrate excellent existing domain knowledge but does not help hiring managers understand soft skills, attitudes and other characteristics that combine to form the overall “talent and capabilities” of a candidate.

A pragmatic approach is therefore to hire on traits such as adaptability, collaboration and innovation alongside evidence of requisite technical capabilities. After all, in a rapidly changing digital landscape you’re hiring for tomorrow’s battle not yesterday’s, so agility is essential. Today’s security teams need to be ready to handle the new risks, challenges and the increased pace of change that Internet of Things (IoT) [Read more on IoT security],  cloud, mobility and social media all bring to the security challenge. The talent pool is limited, as are organisations' overall cyber security resources. It’s time to develop and support from within and broaden recruitment methodologies for those hard-to-fill open positions.

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Topics: machine learning, Automated Threat Detection.