Blogs

Don't let your cybersecurity vendor leave you vulnerable

Posted by Chris Morales on Mar 23, 2017 12:57:20 PM

The U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-Cert) issued a warning last week stating HTTPS interception weakens TLS security. As the use of encryption for privacy has increased, the security industry has responded by intercepting and decrypting SSL sessions to perform deep-packet inspection (DPI).

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Topics: Cyberattacks, SSL Encryption, cyber security, security architecture


The love-hate relationship with SIEMs

Posted by Hitesh Sheth on Mar 7, 2017 12:00:14 PM

This blog was originally published on LinkedIn.

To know SIEM is to love it. And hate it.

Security information and event management (SIEM) is a ubiquitous cybersecurity tool. It’s used by probably every security analyst who works in a security operations center (SOC).

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Topics: Cyberattacks, cyber security, SIEM


An immigrant CEO's story

Posted by Hitesh Sheth on Mar 7, 2017 11:38:30 AM

This blog was originally published on Medium.

Growing up in Kenya, I shared a one-bedroom apartment with my family. In fact, I slept in the laundry/storage room in the constant presence of family laundry and stacks of suitcases. You might say I’ve been sensitive to the invasive presence of others from an early age. 

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Topics: cyber security, artificial intelligence, technology, politics, immigration


Roundtable roundup from the European Information Security Summit

Posted by Matt Walmsley on Feb 23, 2017 8:23:53 AM

Earlier this  week  I was at TEISS hosting a round table session titled “Artificial Intelligence – Fancy maths or a pragmatic answer to cyber security gaps and challenges?”

We explored human, threat, and technical dimensions to the current drivers and role of AI in cybersecurity. Here's a summary of our group's discussion.

 

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Topics: Automated Threat Detection., Encryption, AI


Splunk integration: A deep dive into the adaptive security architecture

Posted by Chris Morales on Feb 8, 2017 5:16:46 PM

Integration decreases cost and increases effectiveness. For this reason, Vectra is adaptive by design. Everything we do considers how to help our customers be more efficient and faster at fighting attacks. Sometimes it involves determining where to deliver sophisticated threat intelligence beyond the Vectra. Working with Splunk is a great example of this integration. 

According to Gartner, “The goal is not to replace traditional SIEM systems, but rather to provide high-assurance, domain specific, risk-prioritized actionable insight into threats, helping enterprises to focus their security operations response processes on the threats and events that represent the most risk to them."

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An analysis of the Shamoon 2 malware attack

Posted by Greg Linares on Feb 7, 2017 11:03:14 AM

Saudi officials recently warned organizations in the kingdom to be on the alert for the Shamoon 2 malware, which cripples computers by wiping their hard disks. In 2012, Shamoon crippled Saudi Aramco and this new variant was reportedly targeted at the Saudi labor ministry as well as several engineering and manufacturing companies.

During a recent analysis, Vectra Networks came across a malicious component that appears to be used in conjunction with spear-phishing-delivered malicious documents.

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Topics: cybersecurity, Threat Labs, AI, threat research


What’s an adaptive security architecture and why do you need it?

Posted by Mike Banic, VP of Marketing, Vectra Networks on Feb 1, 2017 5:13:09 PM

As long as I can recall, enterprises have always relied on prevention and policy-based controls for security, deploying products such as antivirus software, IDS/IPS and firewalls.

But as we now know, and industry research firms have stated, they aren’t enough to adequately deal with today’s threat environment, which is flooded by a dizzy array of advanced and targeted attacks.

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Topics: Cyberattacks, network security, cybersecurity, security architecture, gartner


Shamoon 2: Same or better than the original?

Posted by Chris Morales on Jan 27, 2017 4:29:03 PM

Shamoon is back, although we are not entirely sure it ever left.

 On Monday, Saudi Arabia warned organizations in the kingdom to be on alert for the Shamoon virus, which cripples computers by wiping their disks. The labor ministry said it had been attacked and a chemicals firm reported a network disruption. This has been dubbed Shamoon 2 by some news outlets.

 Here is a simple explanation of what is likely to be happening.

 The adversary is using a combination of social engineering and email phishing to infect one or a number of computers on an organization’s networks. Either downloading a file or clicking a link downloads an exploit kit.

 The computers infected with the exploit kit rapidly perform port sweeps across the subnet to which hosts are connected. Using automated replication, it then attempts to move laterally via remote procedure calls (RPCs). To cover an organization’s entire network, the adversary needs to infect machines on many subnets.

Shamoon 2, like Shamoon that struck Saudi Aramco in 2012, moves extremely fast with the sole objective of destroying systems and bringing businesses to their knees. 

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Healthcare is one of cybercrime’s most targeted sectors

Posted by Chris Morales on Jan 25, 2017 7:02:52 PM

Healthcare organizations are prime targets of cyber attackers because they are reliant on vulnerable legacy systems, medical IoT devices with weak security and have a life or death need for immediate access to information.

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Our focus on Russian hacking obscures the real problem

Posted by Hitesh Sheth on Jan 18, 2017 4:25:34 PM

This blog was originally published on The Hill.

If I didn’t deal daily with the mechanics of cybersecurity, I might be captivated by Washington’s focus on whether the Russians penetrated the Democratic National Committee and why they did it. As a citizen, I follow politics and geopolitics, too.

But here’s what bothers me:

The hacking tools identified by the FBI and Department of Homeland Security are freely available on the internet. The Russians can use them. So can the Iranians, the Chinese, the North Koreans and any other nation-state which wants to penetrate the networks that serve our political parties and government. There is nothing special or even uniquely “Russian” about them. And they often work.

I am not surprised that such common tools are employed against us. We should expect it. In the cybersecurity business we know the focus should be on our ineffective defense, rather than on finding the guilty country.

Whoever got inside the DNC networks had seven months to plumb about, pilfer embarrassing material, package it for shipping and make off with it, all without detection. The DNC had no way to detect the penetration while it was happening.

Why not? After all, the technology to spot and interrupt hacking while it is in progress exists. We can literally watch hackers and their tools move around inside our networks, probing our vulnerabilities, locating our most sensitive data and setting up private tunnels to take it out of our systems. 

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Topics: cyber security, cybersecurity, hacker, hacking, cyber defense