Blogs

Vectra detection and response to WannaCry ransomware

Posted by Chris Morales on May 16, 2017 8:59:36 AM

Vectra Threat Labs analyzed the WannaCry ransomware to understand its inner workings. They learned that while the way it infects computers is new, the behaviors it performs are business as usual.

WannaCry and its variants behave similarly to other forms of ransomware that Vectra has detected and enabled customers to stop before experiencing widespread damage. This is a direct benefit of focusing on detecting ransomware behaviors rather than specific exploits or malware. Many of WannaCry’s behaviors are reconnaissance and lateral movement on the internal network, within the enterprise perimeter.

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Topics: Cyberattacks, cyber security, Ransomware, cyber security gap, AI, cyber defense, WannaCry


The existential threat of IP theft

Posted by Kevin Kennedy on Apr 19, 2017 5:41:26 PM

Confusion reigns on the origin of the term "bullseye." Some say it started when English archers showed off their accuracy by shooting arrows through the empty eye socket of a bull skull. Others contend it was a reference to a blemish in the center of a glass window pane.

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Topics: Cyberattacks, cyber security, Ransomware, cyber defense, intellectual property


Stealthy ransomware: Extortion evolves

Posted by Kevin Kennedy on Mar 29, 2017 11:22:31 AM

It seems like a new variant or victim of ransomware is in the news every day. It’s newsworthy because it works so well and causes widespread destruction.

So when the recent wave of stories hit about PetrWrap, a variation of the widely known Petya ransomware strain, it was easy to miss the significance. The “no-honor-among-thieves” narrative crowded out its true importance.

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Topics: Cyberattacks, cyber security, Ransomware, cyber defense


Our focus on Russian hacking obscures the real problem

Posted by Hitesh Sheth on Jan 18, 2017 4:25:34 PM

This blog was originally published on The Hill.

If I didn’t deal daily with the mechanics of cybersecurity, I might be captivated by Washington’s focus on whether the Russians penetrated the Democratic National Committee and why they did it. As a citizen, I follow politics and geopolitics, too.

But here’s what bothers me:

The hacking tools identified by the FBI and Department of Homeland Security are freely available on the internet. The Russians can use them. So can the Iranians, the Chinese, the North Koreans and any other nation-state which wants to penetrate the networks that serve our political parties and government. There is nothing special or even uniquely “Russian” about them. And they often work.

I am not surprised that such common tools are employed against us. We should expect it. In the cybersecurity business we know the focus should be on our ineffective defense, rather than on finding the guilty country.

Whoever got inside the DNC networks had seven months to plumb about, pilfer embarrassing material, package it for shipping and make off with it, all without detection. The DNC had no way to detect the penetration while it was happening.

Why not? After all, the technology to spot and interrupt hacking while it is in progress exists. We can literally watch hackers and their tools move around inside our networks, probing our vulnerabilities, locating our most sensitive data and setting up private tunnels to take it out of our systems. 

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Topics: cyber security, cybersecurity, hacker, hacking, cyber defense


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