Blogs

The new vulnerability that creates a dangerous watering hole in your network

Posted by Wade Williamson on Jul 12, 2016 10:06:41 AM

Security researchers with Vectra Threat Labs recently uncovered a critical vulnerability affecting all versions of Microsoft Windows reaching all the way back to Windows 95. The vulnerability allows an attacker to execute code at system level either over a local network or the Internet. As a result, attackers could use this vulnerability both to infect an end-user from the Internet, and then spread through the internal network. 

Vectra and Microsoft collaborated during the investigation of this issue, and Microsoft has delivered a fix as part of Security Bulletin MS16-087, which is available here.

The vulnerabilities, CVE-2016-3238 (MS16-087), and CVE-2016-3239, stem from the way users connect to printers in the office and over the Internet. This vulnerability could enable a relatively unsophisticated attacker to incorporate IoT devices as part of an attack and quickly infiltrate and spread through a network without detection. While this blog provides an overview of the vulnerability, you can read the in-depth technical analysis here. In addition, a video summary of the vulnerability is available here

The vulnerability in question centers around the ways that network users find and use printers on a network. Needless to say, modern organizations often have many users, and likewise often have many different makes and models of printers. Users expect to connect to and use whatever printer is most convenient, and likewise, mobile users expect to be able to come in to the office and print.

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Topics: APT, vulnerability, Microsoft


Turning a Webcam Into a Backdoor

Posted by Vectra Threat Labs on Jan 12, 2016 5:00:00 AM

Why do this?

Reports of successful hacks against Internet of Things (IoT) devices have been on the rise. Most of these efforts have involved demonstrating how to gain access to such a device or to break through its security barrier. Most of these attacks are considered relatively inconsequential because the devices themselves contain no real data of value (such as credit card numbers or PII). The devices in question generally don't provide much value to a botnet owner as they tend to have access to lots bandwidth, but have very little in terms of CPU and RAM.

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Topics: IoT, Internet of Things, APT, Monitoring


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